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Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

1 edition of Saltcedar, an exotic weed of western North American riparian areas found in the catalog.

Saltcedar, an exotic weed of western North American riparian areas

a review of its taxonomy, biology, harmful and beneficial values, and its potential for biological control

by C. Jack DeLoach

  • 157 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service in Temple, Texas .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Tamarisks

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesSaltcedar
    Statementsubmitted by C. Jack DeLoach
    ContributionsUnited States. Agricultural Research Service
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 v. in 1 (443 p.) :
    Number of Pages443
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26462980M
    OCLC/WorldCa42210316

      d) Except for “a” above, specimens with a circumference greater than m at a height of mm at the date of publication of this Notice are not listed for urban areas in Cape Town, the Overberg District Council and Winelands District Council, except when in riparian areas or in a protected area or any property directly abutting a. Area-wide Weed Management The extension delivery and area-wide evaluation of new biologically-based technologies for control of three exotic invasive pest plants in several western ecosystems from Colorado to California and from Mexico north to Canada, with special emphasis on saltcedar.

    Salt cedar Tamarixspp. Practical Guidebook to the Control of Invasive Aquatic and Wetland Plants of the San Francisco Bay - Delta Region. 摘要:Information on description, economic importance, distribution, habitat, history, growth, and impacts and management of species. David M. Merritt, N. Le Roy Poff, Shifting dominance of riparian Populus and Tamarix along gradients of flow alteration in western North American rivers, Ecological Applications, /, 20, 1, (), ().

    Tamarix ramosissima is a rampantly invasive shrub that has dominated riparian zones of arid climates. A massive invasion of T. ramosissmia in the western United States has dominated over a million acres. Typically found in conjunction with other Tamarix species and resultant hybrids, T. ramosissima displaces native plants, drastically alters habitat and food webs for animals, depletes water. Conduct low impact invasive exotic plant control with highly trained and professional field crews that specialize in removing weed plants from sensitive riparian areas. The restoration program is based at Lake Mead National Recreation Area, which is a unit of the National Park Service (NPS). The project partners with the Lake Mead Exotic Plant.


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Saltcedar, an exotic weed of western North American riparian areas by C. Jack DeLoach Download PDF EPUB FB2

Saltcedar, a weed of western North American riparian areas: a review of its taxonomy, biology, harmful and beneficial values, and its potential for biological control.

Final Report for Bureau of Reclamation, Lower Colorado Region, Boulder City, Nevada, pp. Saltcedar, an exotic weed of western North American riparian areas: a review of its taxonomy, biology, harmful and beneficial values, and its potential for biological control.

USDI Bureau of. Saltcedar, an exotic weed of western North American riparian areas: a review of its Saltcedar, biology, harmful, and beneficial values, and its potential for biological control.

Abstract Non-native shrub species in the genus Tamarix (saltcedar, tamarisk) have colonized hundreds of thousands of hectares of floodplains, reservoir margins, and other wetlands in western North by: The genus Tamarix (tamarisk, salt cedar) is composed of about 50–60 species of flowering plants in the family Tamaricaceae, native to drier areas of Eurasia and Africa.

The generic name originated in Latin and may refer to the Tamaris River in Hispania Tarraconensis ().Family: Tamaricaceae.

DeLoach, C.Saltcedar, an Exotic Weed of Western North American Riparian Areas: A Review of Its Taxonomy, Biology, Harmful and Beneficial Values and Its Potential for Biological Control, Final Report to USDI–Bureau of Reclamation, Contract 7-AG, USDA–ARS Grassland, Soil and Water Research Laboratory, Temple, TX.

Scudday JF, A report on the distribution and wildlife use of salt cedar in northwestern Mexico. In: Saltcedar, An Exotic Weed of Western North American Riparian Areas: A Review of Its Taxonomy, Biology, Harmful and Beneficial Values, and Its Potential for Biological Control, 2 [ed.

Saltcedar by DeLoach CJ]. Sheikh MI, Trees of Pakistan. Nonnative T amarix spp. (saltcedar) is among the most invasive and common trees along riparian habitats in the western U S, impacting native plant communities and habitat quality. T amarix dominance causes a reduction in habitat physiognomic heterogeneity in riparian habitats.

DeLoach, C.J., Saltcedar, An Exotic Weed of Western North American Riparian Areas: A Review of Its Taxonomy, Biology, Harmful and Beneficial Values, and Its Potential for Biological Control, Petition to the USDA-APHIS Technical Advisory Group on Biological Control of Weeds.

Considered the worst weed of southwestern riparian areas (DeLoach et al, ). In some areas, “occurs in dense, monotypic stands Once a dense stand of tamarisk is established, there tends to be little regeneration of other species” (Zouhar, ).

Saltcedar invasion has many economic and environmental effects, including displacement of native riparian vegetation and associated wildlife. A biological control program led to the approval in of two insects for introduction but was delayed by the presence of the endangered southwestern willow flycatcher (SWWF) in saltcedar.

Scudday JF, A report on the distribution and wildlife use of salt cedar in northwestern Mexico. In: DeLoach CJ, ed. Saltcedar, An Exotic Weed of Western North American Riparian Areas: A Review of Its Taxonomy, Biology, Harmful and Beneficial Values, and Its Potential for Biological Control.

Final Report. Volume 2. Richard A. Fischer, Jonathon J. Valente, Michael P. Guilfoyle, Spring migrant use of native and saltcedar-dominated riparian areas along the lower Colorado River in Arizona, The Southwestern Naturalist, /MCG, 60, 1, (), ().

The exotic saltcedar occupies headwater, transitional, and depositional watershed portions, and revegetation strategies can be quite different depending on these locations. Regardless of specific socioeconomic or biological needs (or both), sites must often be revegetated after control to avoid reinfestation or invasion by other exotic species.

to speed the spread of this riparian weed. Redding Record Searchlight, 12/27/ are among the most devastating exotic weeds invading western North American riparian ecosystems.

Their effects on native These natural enemies appear to be a major factor in limiting saltcedar populations in much of its area of origin.

At most of the. Widespread invasion of riparian ecosystems by the large bamboo-like grass Arundo donax L. has altered community structure and ecological function of streams in California.

This study evaluated the influence of wildfire on A. donax invasion by investigating its relative rate of reestablishment versus native riparian species after wildfire burned ha of riparian woodlands along the Santa. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library.

Open Library. Featured movies All video latest This Just In Prelinger Archives Democracy Now. Occupy Wall Street TV NSA Clip Library. TV News. Top. Saltcedar, Tamarix spp., is an exotic shrub to small tree that has invaded ap- proximately million acres of riparian habitat across the western US from California to the central Great Plains and from northern Mexico to Montana.

It is estimated to have caused $16 billion in. Use of Common Riparian Woody Plants of the Intermountain West and Pacific Northwest Regions This Field Guide is intended as a pocket field guide for the identification of many of the common native woody plants that are found in riparian areas in the Intermountain West and Pacific Northwestern regions of the United States.

Identifying. Diorhabda carinulata is a species of leaf beetle known as the northern tamarisk beetle, which feeds on tamarisk trees from southern Russia and Iran to Mongolia and western China. This beetle is used in North America as a biological pest control agent against saltcedar or tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), an invasive species in arid and semiarid ecosystems (where D.

carinulata and its closely related. In addition, salt cedar and Russian olive can drastically alter ecological processes in these plains riparian areas. Tamarisk is an early successional species with dispersal strategies and habitat requirements similar to native cottonwood and willow (Lesica and Miles, ).Recognition of these groups and species has already facilitated the successful introduction of different Diorhabda ecotypes whose establishment success varies latitudinally.

2. Saltcedar is one of the most deleterious, exotic invaders of riparian areas in the western U.S. Due to its high water use, negative impact on soil salinity, and other.Project Methods Over the next five years we will conduct research to develop appropriate strategies to control exotic weeds and encroaching native species in western rangelands and riparian areas.

Control measures will focus on using classical biological control to find insect enemies of exotic weeds, as well as other control measures, such as mechanical treatments.